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 Table of Contents  
VIEWPOINT
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 5  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 185-187

A new behavioral addiction: NEWS addiction


1 Department of Psychiatry, Yenepoya Medical College, Yenepoya Deemed to be University, Mangalore, Karnataka, India
2 Department of Psychiatry, AJ Institute of Medical Sciences, Mangalore, Karnataka, India
3 Yenepoya Psychiatry Rehabilitation Centre, Yenepoya Medical College, Mangalore, Karnataka, India

Date of Submission31-Oct-2020
Date of Decision05-Jan-2021
Date of Acceptance22-Jan-2021
Date of Web Publication28-Oct-2021

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Anil Kakunje
Department of Psychiatry, Yenepoya Medical College, Yenepoya Deemed to be University, Mangalore, Karnataka
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/aip.aip_129_20

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  Abstract 


Addictions are seen with non - psychoactive substances also. Behavioral addictions is a broad terminology used related to this. The essential feature of behavioral addictions is the failure to resist an impulse, drive or temptation to perform an act that is harmful to the person or to others. There are many individual (personal vulnerability) factors that may be involved in the acquisition, development and maintenance of behavioral addictions. Concepts of Internet addiction, Gaming addiction, Facebook addiction, PubG addiction are already in use and seen in clinical practice. There are people who read multiple newspapers and watch news channels all the time. Addiction to NEWS has become more prevalent with the increase in news channels and internet sources. Connecting to the News is becoming more prevalent with the media rich environment we live in. Based on different needs each person gets attracted to certain types of news that feeds these needs. When a person has a goal to know what is happening around, he never really achieves it because there is always something new happening! Persons with News addiction also feel emptiness when they are unable to get the news and can experience cravings when they go through news withdrawal. Identification is the first step in the process of learning about a problem / disorder. There needs to be systematic studies on this topic. 'NEWS addiction' has all the features to be the next major behavioral addiction disorder.

Keywords: Abuse, addiction, behavior, news


How to cite this article:
Kakunje A, Shetty N, K Kumar KP, Puthran S. A new behavioral addiction: NEWS addiction. Ann Indian Psychiatry 2021;5:185-7

How to cite this URL:
Kakunje A, Shetty N, K Kumar KP, Puthran S. A new behavioral addiction: NEWS addiction. Ann Indian Psychiatry [serial online] 2021 [cited 2021 Dec 6];5:185-7. Available from: https://www.anip.co.in/text.asp?2021/5/2/185/329427




  Introduction Top


Behavioral addictions are a controversial concept. Several behaviors, besides psychoactive substance ingestion, produce short-term reward. Diminished control is a core defining concept of many behavioral addictions like psychoactive substance dependence. This similarity has given rise to the concept of nonsubstance addictions or behavioral addictions.[1]

The essential feature of behavioral addictions is the failure to resist an impulse, drive, or temptation to perform an act that is harmful to the person or to others. Each behavioral addiction is characterized by a recurrent pattern of behavior that has this essential feature within a specific domain. The repetitive engagement in these behaviors ultimately interferes with functioning in other domains.[1]

Existing data are most extensive for pathological gambling, with only limited data for compulsive buying, internet addiction, and video/computer game addiction, sexual addiction, or excessive tanning.[1] The key feature of pathological gambling, renamed gambling disorder in Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders-5 (DSM-5), is the loss of control over urges to gamble, with numerous adverse consequences in multiple domains of functioning.[2] The status of pathological gambling as a behavioral addiction is least disputed, (now called “Gambling Disorder”) published in the fifth edition of the DSM-5,[3] and for the very first time, problem gambling was included in the section of “Substance-related and Addiction Disorders” (rather than in the section on impulse control disorders as had been the case since 1980.[4]

Problematic Internet use or “Internet addiction” is a controversial entity, not listed in DSM-5. It is too heterogeneous, encompassing a variety of online behaviors such as gaming, gambling, social networking, shopping, and sexual activities.[2] DSM-5 includes “Internet Gaming Disorder” in section three (Emerging Measures and Models) as an area that required further research.[5],[6] Problematic online gaming is not synonymous with internet addiction and that there is regarded as a separate entity.[6] Compulsive sexual behavior disorder is the term proposed for a condition also known as hypersexual disorder and sex addiction.[7] Compulsive buying refers to irresistible and overwhelming urges to buy objects that are usually not needed.[8] Terms such as Smartphone,[9] Facebook,[10] WatsApp,[11] and PUBG[12] addictions are in use and seen in clinical practice.

There are many individual (personal vulnerability) factors that may be involved in the acquisition, development and maintenance of behavioral addictions (personality traits, biological and genetic predispositions, unconscious motivations, learning and conditioning effects, thoughts, beliefs, and attitudes).[13] The ego-syntonic nature of these behaviors is experientially similar to the experience of substance use disorders.[1] However, there are also some key risk factors that are highly associated with developing almost any addiction such as family history of addiction, having comorbid psychological problems, lack of family involvement and supervision. Psychological factors such as low self-esteem, loneliness, depression, anxiety, and stress all appear to be common among those with behavioral addictions.[13] Serotonin which is involved with inhibition of behavior, and dopamine involved with learning, motivation, and the salience of stimuli, including rewards, may contribute significantly to both substance dependences and behavioral addictions. Like all behavioral addictions, debate exists about where to set the threshold between normal and abnormal levels.[1]


  News Addiction Top


Most of the Indians are habituated to reading newspapers, some feel restless, others feel upset, some constipated and some furious if they do not get their morning newspaper. Most of the office hours in government offices are spent reading and discussing issues on different newspapers. There are people who buy and read multiple newspapers.[14] Addiction to news has become more prevalent with the increase in news channels and internet sources. Constantly following the news may make one feel connected to the world. Connecting to the News is becoming more prevalent with the media rich environment we live in. Based on different needs each person gets attracted to certain types of news that feeds these needs. When a person has a goal to know what is happening around, he never really achieves it because there is always something new happening! As stories develop, one wants to know how they continue.[15] With hundreds of arbitrary storylines moving in one's head, this craving is increasingly compelling and hard to ignore; unlike other addictions, news addictions could be more among the educated.

We are constantly bombarded with news bites as well as by news shows, headlines in texts, pop-ups on our mobiles/computers, radio shows, and social media. People tend to crave for news because without it, they feel empty and anxious.[15] Our perception of the world is shaped by the media, and they have a strong influence on everyone. With the rise of smart phones and app based news portals, there is a tremendous rise in 24 h news flow. Headlines are designed to make the reader click on the story. Clickbait headlines work, even on people who recognize them for what they are, and they often emphasize the most dramatic stories of the day.[16]

News channels are much different from the past where emphasis was on objective, unbiased reporting; today news reporting is for entertainment, to support other network shows, to promote advertising, and to increase curiosity/anxiety so that people will tune in for more.

A person can feel upset when one cannot find out what happened in the latest incident, and when one stops communication with others to watch the news; are all signs of a news addiction. Persons with News addiction also feel emptiness when they are unable to get the news. They find themselves experience cravings when they go through news withdrawal.[15]


  Conclusion Top


Growing evidence indicates that behavioral addictions resemble substance addictions in many domains.[1] Identification is the first step in the process of learning about a disorder. There needs to be systematic studies on this topic. “NEWS addiction” has all the potential to be the next major behavioral addiction disorder.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Grant JE, Potenza MN, Weinstein A, Gorelick DA. Introduction to behavioral addictions. Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse 2010;36:233-41.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Starcevic V, Khazaal Y. Relationships between behavioral addictions and psychiatric disorders: What is known and what is yet to be learned? Front Psychiatry 2017;8:53.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. 5th ed.. Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Association; 2013.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Rash CJ, Petry NM. Gambling disorder in the DSM-5: Opportunities to improve diagnosis and treatment especially in substance use and homeless populations. Curr Addict Rep 2016;3:249-53.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Griffiths MD, Kuss DJ, Pontes H. A brief overview of Internet gaming disorder and its treatment. Aust Clin Psychol 2016;2:20108.  Back to cited text no. 5
    
6.
Király O, Griffiths MD, Urbán R, Farkas J, Kökönyei G, Elekes Z, et al. Problematic internet use and problematic online gaming are not the same: Findings from a large nationally representative adolescent sample. Cyberpsychol Behav Soc Netw 2014;17:749-54.  Back to cited text no. 6
    
7.
Müller A, Mitchell JE, Zwaan M. Compulsive buying. Am J Addict 2015;24:132-7.  Back to cited text no. 7
    
8.
Gopalan RT. Intimacy and Developing Personal Relationships in the Virtual World. IGI Global. 1st ed. USA: Hershey PA, USA; 2018.  Back to cited text no. 8
    
9.
Panova T, Carbonell X. Is smartphone addiction really an addiction? J Behav Addict 2018;7:252-9.  Back to cited text no. 9
    
10.
Biolcati R, Mancini G, Pupi V, Mugheddu V. Facebook addiction: onset predictors. J Clin Med 2018;7:118.  Back to cited text no. 10
    
11.
Singh N, Chopra N, Kaur J. A study to analyze relationship between psychological behavioral factors on WhatsApp addiction among youth in Jalandhar district in Punjab. Eur J Bus Manage 2014;6:269-73.  Back to cited text no. 11
    
12.
D'Souza L, Manish S, Deeksha S. Development and validation of PUBG addiction test (PAT). Int J Indian Psychol 2019;7:562-74.  Back to cited text no. 12
    
13.
Griffiths M. Classification and treatment of behavioral addictions. Nurs Pract 2015. p. 44-6. Available from: https://www.nursinginpractice.com/article/classification-and-treatment-behavioural-addictions. [Last accessed 2019 Jul 03].  Back to cited text no. 13
    
14.
Satpathy SK. Why Newspaper Reading an Addiction. Daily Pioneer. June 02, 2018. Available from: https://www.dailypioneer.com/2018/state-editions/why-newspaper-reading-an-addiction.html.[Last accessed on 2019 Jul 03].  Back to cited text no. 14
    
15.
Kimmel JI. Are You Addicted To The News? An Electronic Mental Health Newsletter Volume 11, Number 2. Available from: https://www.kimmelpsychology.com/are-you-addicted-to-the-news. [Last accessed on 2019 Jul 03].  Back to cited text no. 15
    
16.
Obscura L. How Does the Language of Headlines Work? The Answer May Surprise You. In Daily. Available from: https://daily.jstor.org/how-does-the-language-of-headlines-work-the-answer-may-surprise-you/. [Last accessed on 2019 Jul 03].  Back to cited text no. 16
    




 

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Introduction
News Addiction
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